America in the Kingdom Parables

C.O. Stadslkev - 1959

The Ten Pieces of Money

Luke 19:12-27

   The Parable of the Ten Pieces of Money is clearly a King­dom parable. The ten servants who were given the pieces of money, or the ten pounds, represent ten-tribed Israel who had been carried into the Assyrian captivity but who are now known as the nations of Christendom.

   The nobleman in this parable, who went into a far country' to receive for himself a kingdom and to return, is Christ.

   The citizens who hated the Nobleman and sent a message after Him saying, "We will not have this :man to reign over us" are the ones who cried, "Let Him be crucified. We have no king but Caesar."

   With these self-evident facts in mind we shall read the Parable of the Ten Pieces of Money as found in Luke 19: 12-27: Jesus said, "A certain noblemen went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return. And he called his ten servants, and delivered them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come."

   "But the citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, we will not have this man to reign over us. And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading."

   "Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds. And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities."

   "And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained live pounds. And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities."

   "And another came, saying, Lord, behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin: For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow. And he saith unto him, Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow: Wherefore then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have re­quired mine own with usury?

   "And he said unto them that stood by, Take from him the pound, and give it to him that hath ten pounds. (And they said unto him, Lord, he hath ten pounds.) For I say unto you, That unto every one which hath shall be given; and from him that hath not, even that he hath shall be taken away from him. But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay them before me."

   According to verse 15 it will be at the return of Christ and the end of the present age when He will call His ten servants into account for how they have managed the Lord's money. And it will also be at the end of the present age when the Lord will command "But those mine enemies which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither and slay them before me."

   Communism is now the world-wide manifestation and federation of the enemies of the Lord. And the fact that world communism must be destroyed before the Kingdom of God on earth can be fully realized is too apparent to need any comment.

   It is interesting to note that the ten servants were judged by how they had managed money.

   Money itself is not wealth; it merely represents wealth. Therefore as we hear so often in our time, mismanaged money can be used to make money worthless, as in the case of the German mark. In an article by Daniel L. Cobb, Sec'y to President Wilson at the Peace Conference, which appeared in the April 5, 1934 issue of The National Taxpayer we read: "The German Inflation was an International Bankers' Masterpiece. It was a clever scheme to kill two birds with one stone."

   In another paragraph Cobb wrote, "Germany was a defeated nation, they had surrendered everything, even the control of their monetary system, to the Allies."

   Jesus, of course, knew that through the manipulation of money the people could and would be robbed of all their possessions, as has happened repeatedly in our own nation by man made money panics or contraction of credit called deflation. Extreme inflation, on the other hand, can be used to destroy the value of money itself.

   Money is not only the representative of all wealth and all kinds of wealth, while it is in itself valueless, money is the only thing a sovereign people can and must create. We can grow, raise, produce and manufacture many things, but money we must create.

   This creation of money and its righteous and scientific management is one of the most important responsibilities of any government. Therefore we can understand why Christ said that the ten servants would be judged by how they had managed money.

   There can be no question about the ten servants in this parable representing ten-tribed Israel, who are now the Anglo-Saxons, for repeatedly in the Old Scriptures God calls Israel His servant.

   Isaiah 44:1 states, "Yet now hear, 0 Jacob my servant; and Israel, whom I have chosen."

   In Isaiah 49:3 we read, "Thou art my servant, 0 Israel, in whom I will be glorified."

   When the Lord called His servants for an accounting it was that He might know how much every man had gained by trading, not by hoarding, but by trading, thus showing that the sole function of money is to serve as a medium of ex­change and to facilitate trade.

   And as stated before, one of the most important functions of any government is to maintain a balance between goods and services that people have to trade and the necessary money supply to make their trade.

   The two first servants reported how much they had gained or how much their money had increased the ex­change of goods and services, which in turn had made the creation of more money possible. These two were com­mended and rewarded.

   The last servant called to give an account said, "Lord, behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin: For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow."

   Note carefully the words of both the last servant and the Lord. The Lord replied, "Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest (claimed) that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that l did not sow: Wherefore (if that is what you believed) then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have required mine own with usury?"

   The words of the Lord in verse 23 have been used by some to justify the taking of usury which, of course, is as absurd as it is unscriptural, for just the opposite is the case.

   The Lord said "Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant," and so He did, (paraphrasing some) "if you had actually believed that I was a mean and cruel man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow, then you would have arranged for my money to gather usury."

   If this servant is made to represent an individual rather than a civil government then we find Jesus condemning thrift and saving which, of course, the Lord never did. But when we keep in mind that the servants in this parable represent governments, it all fits and makes sense.

   The last servant represents civil administrations which have failed or refused to keep the proper amount of money in circulation thereby enabling the people to exchange or trade all their goods and services. This servant was called "thou wicked servant," and rightly so, for extreme inflation or deflation of the money of a nation is a very wicked practice.

   If, as some teach, Jesus in this parable was upholding usury then He would be contradicting everything taught throughout the Scriptures concerning usury.
But Jesus did not uphold usury. He stated that those who take usury "take up that which they did not lay down and reap that which they did not sow." In other words, they steal.

 

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